Neil's Puzzle Building Blog
31Mar/141

The Illusion Puzzle

I've reviewed a couple of Michael Toulouzas' puzzles and each time I receive a new puzzle from him, I'm stunned by the look and quality of his work. The latest piece I received is "The Illusion Puzzle", a six piece interlocking puzzle, that as Mike himself points out is not quite what it seems.

The Illusion Puzzle by Mike Toulouzas

The Illusion Puzzle by Mike Toulouzas

The Illusion Puzzle by Mike Toulouzas

The Illusion Puzzle by Mike Toulouzas


By the time I saw this puzzle, and decided that I wanted a copy, Mike had already sold through his initial run, but agreed to let me know when he had more available. It took a little time, but true to his word, he got in touch to offer me a copy. I didn't hesitate, and before too long, the box arrived from Mike.

My initial exploration didn't reveal much, and the puzzle seemed to be fairly well locked up. Of course with some careful finger placement, I found a little movement, and before I knew what had happened, I had six dissimilar pieces in my lap, and no idea where they went in relation to each other, and no real idea about the motion needed to put it back together. Guess I was going to have to truly solve this one with no hints, or reference from the solved puzzle.

One of the pieces from the Illusion Puzzle

One of the pieces from the Illusion Puzzle

Looking at the pieces, there's some interesting pyramids which stick out and really do a great job of getting the way of solving the puzzle. That said, they also give you a clue as to how each piece must be oriented in the solution, since those blocks fit into cutouts in the other pieces. With some analysis, it's possible to minimise the possible combinations and significantly reduce the permutations you need to try. Of course there's only one way that the pieces will come together, and I had many attempts where I thought I had the orientation correct to be thwarted by one of those pyramids stopping the pieces from coming together.

Two halves make a whole

Two halves make a whole

Despite the puzzle exploding when I took it apart, this works very similar to a Sliding Star puzzle, and two halves glide together smoothly once the pieces are in the correct orientation, and you have the correct two sub assemblies created. I can now take it apart and put it back together without it exploding, and each time marvel at the design which created such a complicated set of interactions in what looks like a simple puzzle.

If you like this type of interlocking polyhedral puzzle, I highly recommend The Illusion, or any of Mike's work, if you can get a copy.



14Mar/140

Don’t Shout

Back in 2011, Phil Tomlinson came out with his first puzzle box, The Always Empty Box, which I was very pleased to be able to obtain a copy, and was really impressed with his first attempt. Well Phil has now produced his second puzzle box, the Don't Shout box, and I'm pleased to say it's every bit as good as the first.

Don't Shout by Phil Tomlinson

Don't Shout by Phil Tomlinson

Looking very similar to his first box, and being the same size, the two puzzles look great together. Measuring 3-1/4" x 3-1/2" x 5-1/4", the only external difference to the original puzzle is the addition of a stripe across the top of the box. Phil produced two options, with either a Maple stripe, or a Wenge Stripe across the centre. I opted for the Wenge, however there's no difference between the mechanisms. It's all down to personal preference, and I really like the look of Wenge.

Despite the two puzzle boxes looking the same, I'm sure I don't need to tell you that the opening mechanisms are completely different between each puzzle. Before playing with the new puzzle, I took the original out of my collection and re-opened it. I'm pleased to say that despite knowing how to open it, I'd forgotten one step, and had to spend a good five minutes to figure out how to open it again. It's still a great puzzle, and made me smile re-opening it. Putting aside the Always Empty Box, I turned my attention to the Don't Shout.

Puzzle Box Brothers

Puzzle Box Brothers

Phil gave the same great puzzle documents with the box as he did on the first box, including feeding instructions for the box. It may seem silly, but it's a great touch, and really shows that Phil is putting a lot of himself into his puzzles. Very quickly you'll find that the hints of the first puzzle are present here, however it certainly doesn't act the same way. The first move is going to be fairly familiar for fans of the Japanese sliding puzzle box, but that's where the similarity ends. The next move is great, and totally unexpected. After that there's some symmetry to the solution, until the last move which will once again challenge you to find out how the box opens. That final move reminds me a lot of Phil's first box in that it was a great motion, and was easy to miss or prevent yourself from opening the puzzle due to some clumsy fingering.

Don't shout Open

Don't shout Open

Thanks Phil, you've made another great box, and I'm pleased that I have been able to add both of your boxes to my collection. They're great puzzles, and if you see one for sale, pick it up. It's unusual, and well worth a place on the puzzle shelves. There's apparently a nod to the opening mechanism in the name. I needed a small hint from Phil to understand the reference, but it is there, and it is clever.



6Mar/141

Angel Box

Wil Strijbos is a well-known name in the puzzle world, with his metal puzzles being beautifully made, and highly sought after. Not only does he design and sell his own puzzles, but he seems to be able to find rare puzzles which other people, myself included, seem near impossible to find. I have no idea how he comes across some of the items, but all you need to do is to ask. When Wil announced his latest sequential discovery puzzle "The Angel Box" with a fairly long story about its creation, it sounded pretty interesting, and given enough time, one found its way to me.

The Angel Box from Wil Strijbos

The Angel Box from Wil Strijbos

If you've ordered a puzzle from Wil in the past, you'll know immediately when it arrives, as the package is always completely covered in a layer of brown packing tape. After that, there's various quantities of bubble wrap and newspaper to keep the puzzle safe. The Angel Box takes the packing one step further, and you'll find the puzzle itself wrapped in the very attractive birthday gift style box, complete with bow and gift tag.

An early birthday present

An early birthday present

Look what's inside

Look what's inside

As you've probably realised already, this is a big puzzle. At 6.25" x 4.33" x 2.75" and weighing in at a whopping 1.9Kg it's fair to call this heavy metal. Made from some pretty serious aluminium, while the puzzle isn't a solid block, it is solid. I certainly recommend puzzling with this one at the table. Not just due to the potential damage you could do from dropping the puzzle, but also due to the tools that you'll start accumulating as you work through the puzzle. The small peep-hole in the side gives a hint of the goal, to remove the Angel from the box.

Your first challenge is the padlock on the front of the box, and as you'd expect from a puzzle, the small metal tag held in the shackle doesn't contain the code you need to open the lock. That would be far too simple, and if you've read any of my other reviews of Wil's puzzles, you'll know that opening a puzzle for the first time tends not to be simple! At least the plate gives you the clue that the code is 4 digits which should make life a little easier for you.

Before too long, you should have the padlock removed, and be able to make some progress, although it may not seem helpful at first. At this stage, there's not a lot of options to progress, and as with any good sequential discovery puzzle, you'll quickly find a few tools, which in theory should be useful. Finding out what to do with the tools you've found is all part of the fun, and take heed from Wil's own guidelines, that the padlock is not needed to solve the puzzle. Don't be tempted to use parts of it in the solution. He gets very upset if you use the padlock as a tool!

Looking around the puzzle, you'll find a number of small holes scattered about, and figuring out how to use the tools you have, and the correct sequence to use what you'll find as you explore is the key to progress. There's a great sense of achievement as you discover how the mechanism interacts, and finally make the next step toward progress in solving the puzzle. That's lock #2 down.

That done, another tool will almost magically appear, and allow some fairly obvious progress toward opening the box. Lock #3 passed. Then things get interesting, and this is where I lost one of my tools. There's a little flaw in the design of the puzzle, which allows you to lose the tool you need, and potentially prevent part of the mechanism from working correctly. To my mind, it would be a fairly simple issue to fix, but for now, a little care is needed not to lose a key tool. With this part of the puzzle carefully navigated, you'll have lock #4 solved, and the goal should be in sight.

The Angel in the centre of the box is within grasp, but there's a final lock, a cage, keeping her locked away. It shouldn't take you long to get past this final lock and release the Angel. Lock #5 solved.

The Angel and her heart

The Angel and her heart

With the Angel free, you're not quite done. Freeing her heart is the last piece of the puzzle. A small note located with her will leave you with a final set of instructions... but I'll leave it for you to decide whether to call the number or not. Perhaps Google it first!

Overall The Angel Box is a nice puzzle. Far simpler than I had thought it was going to be, and it took me far less time to solve than I had perhaps hoped for a puzzle at this price. Start to finish I had the puzzle open in 10 minutes so it's certainly not a puzzle which will have you stuck for weeks. That said, my solve time may not be representative of the mileage others have had. Now my challenge is whether to display her inside her birthday box, or as the attractive aluminium puzzle that she is outside the box.